Economic Justice News

  • Askren: Relief fund to help area residents

    Commercial-News

    Since March, our office has been working to create, and then fund, a COVID-19 Relief Fund for any resident in our coverage area who has lost wages or employment due to the COVID-19. Applicants will have to send, via email or text, a picture of their valid ID and unemployment acceptance/rejection letter. Remember we are all in this together. Live United. Sherri M. Askren is president of United Way of Danville Area, Inc., 28 W. North St., Danville, IL 61832.

  • Family ravaged by coronavirus begged for tests, hospital care, but was repeatedly denied

    Detroit Free Press

    Keith's mom and dad went, too. "We just thought he had the flu," Keith said. He went to Beaumont Hospital in Grosse Pointe for help, Keith said. "He tells them, 'My father has the coronavirus. I am coughing,' " Keith said. "He had a fever of 101.

  • How Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh changed the fringe right

    The Buffalo News

    And it had a lasting impact on America's fringe right. He cited the Ku Klux Klan and Weathermen. The KKK targeted blacks, civil rights protesters, Jews and others. We kind of wish he was never associated with the name militia.

  • Reasons many for fewer NH infections than Mass.

    The New Hampshire Union Leader (Manchester)

    People who are asymptomatic, they are going to the liquor, grocery stores, not wearing masks and spreading the virus," said Dr. How many of our residents are staying home even with real illness, not calling out until they have difficulty breathing?

  • Gov. Wolf outlines plan for reopening Pennsylvania but says social distancing must continue for weeks

    The Philadelphia Inquirer

    PHILADELPHIA _ Gov. Tom Wolf outlined a broad plan Friday to reopen parts of Pennsylvania's economy by region, but cautioned that the phased reopening cannot happen until the spread of the coronavirus slows further. There were 1,633 coronavirus patients hospitalized in Southeastern Pennsylvania on Friday, including 852 in city hospitals.

  • Unequal impact: Black Northeast Mississippians discuss impact of COVID-19 within their communities

    Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal

    Of the then-current number of deaths linked to COVID-19, 66 percent were black. Nancy Hooks, a member of the health ministry at White Hill Missionary Baptist Church, owns Hooks Diabetes and Medicine Clinic. The group includes black leaders in business, faith, health care and education and works to address issues within the African American community.

  • Life on the Front: Valdosta nurse treats virus in NYC

    The Valdosta Daily Times

    That's where they brought in the deployments of workers like myself to come help. It's very bad." While she holds onto a fear of the virus, she recalls being excited to embark on what she believes is her mission in New York. The N95 is good for five days before expiration. New York hospitals are not reusing gowns or PPE, Scruggs said.

  • 25 years later, how Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh changed the fringe right

    The Buffalo News

    And it had a lasting impact on America's fringe right. He cited the Ku Klux Klan and Weathermen. The KKK targeted blacks, civil rights protesters, Jews and others. We kind of wish he was never associated with the name militia.

  • Small, rural counties struggle with COVID-19 in ways big counties don't

    The State

    Sumter County, also in the top five, has just over 100,000 people, but large swaths of rural areas. Unlike Richland and metropolitan Columbia, some of those counties don't even have hospitals to care for coronavirus patients. Lonnie Hosey, D-Barnwell, said the coronavirus crisis has again focused attention on the health care needs of poor, rural communities in South Carolina.

  • 'Outgunned, outmanned and underfunded': Inside a Chicago hospital's battle against the coronavirus

    Chicago Tribune

    For example, when the outbreak began, Roseland did not have enough temporal thermometers to handle the crush of patients. Terrill Applewhite, chairman of the hospital's COVID-19 task force. "Roseland hospital is in a health care desert. Three more patients were lying on beds around the nurses' station. And that was a good day, she said.

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